IEEE International Conference on Communications
20-24 May 2018 // Kansas City, MO, USA
Communications for Connecting Humanity

Tutorials

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm


TUT01: Network Coding for 5G Systems: From Theory to Practice 

Presenters:    Frank H.P. Fitzek, Muriel Médard

  Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

The tutorial provides an introduction to the rapidly growing research area of network coding focusing on use cases for communication networks, cloud storage and cloud computing. The tutorial will discuss the importance of network coding for the upcoming 5G communication system and how it can be integrated in Software Defined Networks (SDN), Network Function Virtualization (NFV), Content Centric Networks (CCN) in order to fulfill the massive technical requirements on low latency, high throughput, and resilience. We will also explain how the new technology can be implemented using the software library KODO, which is already used by industry and research. The audience will have the possibility to program and evaluate the performance of network coding by means of web tools. No advanced programming experience is needed. The overall goal is to hold a lively tutorial with a lot of examples and demonstrations. The first part of the tutorial provides the participants with the theoretical tools necessary to understand the field of network coding and focuses on the underlying algebraic principles. It will also introduce distributed randomized network codes and discuss their properties. We will not assume any prior knowledge of advanced algebra or optimization. Among other things, network coding can be used to increase throughput and robustness as well as reduce storage requirements, delay, and energy consumption. The second part of the tutorial gives an overview of the different application areas and discusses, which types of networking problems are amenable to network coding (and which aren't). In particular, it covers practical algorithms for data gathering in sensor networks, routing in wireless mesh networks, peer-to-peer networking and content distribution, streaming applications, etc. Finally, we will discuss implementation aspects in real-world systems using openstack and openflow. Such systems may range from core network routers all the way down to mobile phones and tiny sensor nodes. The constraints imposed by these devices in terms of available memory and computing power may differ by several orders of magnitude. As a consequence, the encoding and decoding algorithms need to be carefully adapted to the specific problem at hand. As an example, the size of the finite field for the coding operations has an impact on network coding efficiency, but also on the encoding and decoding complexity. Coding operations may be speed up substantially through the use of specialized hardware, as evidenced by the successful implementation of network coding on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The energy consumed by the coding operations is of particular importance on mobile devices and needs to be considered to avoid offsetting the energy gains offered by network coding.

Frank H. P. Fitzek is a Professor and chair of the communication networks group at Technische Universität Dresden coordinating the 5G Lab Germany. He received his diploma (Dipl.-Ing.) degree in electrical engineering from the University of Technology - Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) - Aachen, Germany, in 1997 and his Ph.D. (Dr.-Ing.) in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University Berlin, Germany in 2002 and became Adjunct Professor at the University of Ferrara, Italy in the same year. In 2003 he joined Aalborg University as Associate Professor and later became Professor. He co-founded several start-up companies starting with acticom GmbH in Berlin in 1999. He has visited various research institutes including Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), VTT, and Arizona State University. In 2005 he won the YRP award for the work on MIMO MDC and received the Young Elite Researcher Award of Denmark. He was selected to receive the NOKIA Champion Award several times in a row from 2007 to 2011. In 2008 he was awarded the Nokia Achievement Award for his work on cooperative networks. In 2011 he received the SAPERE AUDE research grant from the Danish government and in 2012 he received the Vodafone Innovation price. In 2015 he was awarded the honorary degree “Doctor Honoris Causa” from Budapest University of Technology and Economy (BUTE).

Muriel Médard is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. Professor Médard received B.S. degrees in EECS and in Mathematics in 1989, a B.S. degree in Humanities in 1990, a M.S. degree in EE 1991, and a Sc D. degree in EE in 1995, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge. She serves as an associate editor for the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology and is a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Information Theory Society. Professor Médard's research interests are in the areas of network coding and reliable communications, particularly for optical and wireless networks. She was awarded the IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award 2002 for her paper, “The Effect Upon Channel Capacity in Wireless Communications of Perfect and Imperfect Knowledge of the Channel. She was co-awarded the Best Paper Award for G. Weichenberg, V. Chan, M. Médard, “Reliable Architectures for Networks Under Stress”. She received a NSF Career Award in 2001 and was co-winner 2004 Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award, established in 1982 to honor junior faculty members “for distinction in research, teaching and service to the MIT community.” She was named a 2007 Gilbreth Lecturer by the National Academy of Engineering. Professor Médard is a House Master at Next House and a Fellow of IEEE.


TUT02:Fog Services and Enabling Technologies                 

Presenters: Yang Yang, Jianwei Huang, Xiliang Luo, Tao Zhang

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

A key networking trend during the past decade is to push various capabilities, such as computation, control, and storage, to the cloud. Such an over-dependence on the cloud, however, indicates that availability and fault tolerance issues in the cloud would directly impact millions of end-users. Such a cloud-centric architecture is not suitable for satisfying the demands of many delay-sensitive applications in 5G and IoT. In viewing of these challenges, the cloud is now “descending” to the network edge and diffuses among the client devices in both mobile and wireline networks. Such transition leads to the new paradigm of fog computing and networking. This tutorial will provide an overview of fog computing and networking, both in terms of industry practice and academic research, with emphasis on its application in developing innovative 5G technologies and IoT applications. The key topics are: (1) Overview of Fog Computing and Networking; (2) Network Economics for Fog Networking, (3) Enabling Low-Latency Applications in Fog Access Network, (4) Distributed Resource Allocation in Fog Networks, and (5) Fog Computing Technologies for 5G and IoT Applications. The emerging Internet of Things (IoT), 5G wireless systems, and a wide range of new applications such as embedded Artificial Intelligence (AI) have created the need for a new computing and networking paradigm — Fog. Rather than limiting computing to a small number of massive Clouds, Fog distributes computing, storage, control, and networking services closer to the end users along the CloudtoThing continuum. The immersive Fog can address many challenges that Cloud alone cannot effectively address, such as meeting stringent latency requirements, supporting a large number of resource-constrained devices, overcoming network bandwidth constraints, and handling many new security concerns that arise from the emerging IoT. Fog also enables new and disruptive business models. In ddition to allowing services to be provided closer to users, Fog will enable unified end-to-end service platforms and services that combine resources distributed in the Cloud, between the Cloud and the Things, and on the Things. This new Fog computing paradigm can fundamentally reshape computing and networking architectures and the industry landscapes.

Dr. Yang Yang is now a professor with Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, serving as the Director of CAS Key Laboratory of Wireless Sensor Network and Communication, and the Director of Shanghai Research Center for Wireless Communications (WiCO). He is also a Distinguished Adjunct Professor with the School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, serving as a Co-Director of Shanghai Institute of Fog Computing Technology (SHIFT). Prior to these, he has held various faculty positions at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), Brunel University (UK), and University College London (UCL, UK). He received the BEng and MEng degrees from Southeast University, China, in 1996 and 1999, respectively; and the PhD degree from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2002. Yang is a member of the Chief Technical Committee of the National Science and Technology Major Project “New Generation Mobile Wireless Broadband Communication Networks” (2008-2020), which is funded by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) of China. In addition, he is on the Chief Technical Committee for the National 863 Hi-Tech R&D Program “5G System R&D Major Projects”, which is funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of China. Since January 2017, he has been elected as the Director for Greater China Region of the OpenFog Consortium. Yang's current research interests include wireless sensor networks, Internet of Things, Fog computing, Open 5G, and advanced wireless testbeds. He has published more than 150 papers and filed over 80 technical patents in wireless communications. He is a General Co-Chair of IEEE DSP 2018 conference and a TPC Vice-Chair of IEEE ICC 2019 Conference.

Prof. Jianwei Huang is an IEEE Fellow, an IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer, and a Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher in Computer Science. He is a Professor and Director of the Network Communications and Economics Lab (ncel.ie.cuhk.edu.hk), in the Department of Information Engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His main research interests are in the area of network economics and games, with applications in wireless communications, networking, and smart grid. He is the co-recipient of 8 Best Paper Awards, including IEEE Marconi Prize Paper Award in Wireless Communications in 2011. He has co-authored five books, including the first textbook on “Wireless Network Pricing”. He received the CUHK Young Researcher Award in 2014 and IEEE ComSoc Asia-Pacific Outstanding Young Researcher Award in 2009. He has served as an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking, IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications - Cognitive Radio Series. He served as an Editor and Associate Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Communications Society Technology News. He has served as a Guest Editor of IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (three times), IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, IEEE Network, and IEEE Communications Magazine. He has served as Vice Chair of IEEE ComSoc Cognitive Network Technical Committee, Vice Chair and Chair of IEEE ComSoc Multimedia Communications Technical Committee, and a Steering Committee Member of IEEE Transactions on Multimedia. He has served as the TPC or Symposium Co-Chair of IEEE WiOpt 2017/2012, IEEE SDP 2016/2015, IEEE ICCC 2015/2012, NetGCoop 2014, IEEE SmartGridComm 2014, IEEE GLOBECOM 2017/2013/2010, IWCMC 2010, and GameNets 2009. He is the recipient of IEEE ComSoc Multimedia Communications Technical Committee Distinguished Service Award in 2015 and IEEE GLOBECOM Outstanding Service Award in 2010.

Prof. Ai-Chun Pang received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science and Information Engineering from National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, in 1996, 1998 and 2002, respectively. She joined the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering (CSIE), National Taiwan University (NTU), Taipei, Taiwan in 2002. She is now a Professor in CSIE and INM, and is also an Adjunct Research Fellow of Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Her research interests include the design and analysis of wireless and multimedia networking, mobile communications, and cloud datacenter networking. Prof. Xiliang Luo received the B.Sc. degree in physics from Peking University, Beijing, China, in 2001, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA, in 2003 and 2006, respectively. After finishing his Ph.D. studies, he joined Qualcomm Research and carried out cutting edge research at different posts as a Senior Engineer (2006), a Staff Engineer (2010), and then a Senior Staff Engineer (2013), where he was involved in the system designs, analyses, and standardization of 4G LTE. He was the designer of various enhancements to Qualcomm's current LTE solutions and led the designs of Qualcomm’s next generation LTE modem for heterogeneous networks from initial concept to final completion. Since 2014, he has been with the School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, China, as an Associate Professor. He has published over 50 research papers in top journals and conferences. His research interests include signal processing, communications, and information theory. In particular, he is interested in research combining information theory and signal processing theory that can shape and guide the designs of next generation data and information processing networks. He is the co-inventor of over 70 US and international patents, the majority of which have been adopted into current LTE and LTE-advanced standards.


Prof. Ai-Chun Pang received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science and Information Engineering from National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, in 1996, 1998 and 2002, respectively. She joined the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering (CSIE), National Taiwan University (NTU), Taipei, Taiwan in 2002. She is now a Professor in CSIE and INM, and is also an Adjunct Research Fellow of Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Her research interests include the design and analysis of wireless and multimedia networking, mobile communications, and cloud datacenter networking. Prof. Xiliang Luo received the B.Sc. degree in physics from Peking University, Beijing, China, in 2001, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA, in 2003 and 2006, respectively. After finishing his Ph.D. studies, he joined Qualcomm Research and carried out cutting edge research at different posts as a Senior Engineer (2006), a Staff Engineer (2010), and then a Senior Staff Engineer (2013), where he was involved in the system designs, analyses, and standardization of 4G LTE. He was the designer of various enhancements to Qualcomm's current LTE solutions and led the designs of Qualcomm’s next generation LTE modem for heterogeneous networks from initial concept to final completion. Since 2014, he has been with the School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, China, as an Associate Professor. He has published over 50 research papers in top journals and conferences. His research interests include signal processing, communications, and information theory. In particular, he is interested in research combining information theory and signal processing theory that can shape and guide the designs of next generation data and information processing networks. He is the co-inventor of over 70 US and international patents, the majority of which have been adopted into current LTE and LTE-advanced standards.
 


TUT03: From Connected Cars to Vehicle Micro Clouds to Virtual Edges

Presenters: Falko Dressler, Onur Altintas

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

We will primarily discuss the challenges and opportunities of the connected cars vision in relation to the need for distributed data management solutions ranging from the vehicle to the mobile edge and to the data centers. As a novel concept, vehicle micro clouds have been pro-posed that bridge the gap between fully distributed vehicular networks based on short range device to device communication and 4G+ based infrastructure for centralized solutions. Using selected application examples including the use of virtual traffic lights, intelligent intersection management, and platooning, we assess the needs on the underlying system components with a particular focus on inter-vehicle communication. We also shed light on the potentials of a vehicular cloud based on parked vehicles as a spatio-temporal network and storage infra-structure. Vehicular networking solutions have been investigated for more than a decade but recent standardization efforts just enable a broad use of this technology to build large scale Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). One of the key questions is whether some pre-deployed infrastructure is needed to enable and to boost vehicular networks. We see many benefits in such infrastructure to store information and to provide connectivity among the vehicles. Yet, instead of using solely Roadside Units (RSUs), we envision to also make use of vehicles (parked or not) to provide such vehicular cloud services.

Falko Dressler is Full Professor for Computer Science and Chair for Distributed Embedded Systems at the Heinz Nixdorf Institute and the Dept. of Computer Science, Paderborn University, where he is also a member of the University Senate. Before moving to Paderborn, he was a Full Professor at the Institute of Computer Science, University of Innsbruck and an Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Computer Science, University of Erlangen. He received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the Dept. of Computer Science, University of Erlangen in 1998 and 2003, respectively. Dr. Dressler is associate editor-in-chief for Elsevier Computer Communications as well as an editor for journals such as IEEE Trans. on Mobile Computing, Elsevier Ad Hoc Networks, and Elsevier Nano Communication Networks. He has been guest editor of special issues in IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Communications Magazine, Elsevier Ad Hoc Networks, and many others. He has been chairing conferences such as IEEE INFOCOM, ACM MobiSys, ACM MobiHoc, IEEE VNC, IEEE GLOBECOM, and many others. He authored the textbooks Self-Organization in Sensor and Actor Networks published by Wiley & Sons and Vehicular Networking published by Cambridge University Press. He has been an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer as well as an ACM Distinguished Speaker. Dr. Dressler is an IEEE Fellow as well as a Senior Member of ACM, and member of GI (German Computer Science Society). He also serves in the IEEE COMSOC Conference Council. His research objectives include adaptive wireless networking, self-organization techniques, and embedded system de-sign with applications in ad hoc and sensor networks, vehicular networks, industrial wireless networks, and nano-networking.

Onur Altintas is a Fellow at the Network Division of Toyota InfoTechnology Center, USA, Inc., in Mountain View, California. From 1999 to 2001 he was with Toyota Motor Corporation and was also a visiting researcher at Telcordia Technologies. From 2001 to 2004 he was with Toyota InfoTechnology Center USA. Before joining Toyota Motor Corporation in 1999, he was a research scientist at Ultra High Speed Network and Computer Technology Labs (UNCL), Tokyo. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Orta Dogu Teknik Universitesi, Ankara, Turkey, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Tokyo, Japan; all in electrical engineering. He has been the co-founder and general co-chair of the IEEE Vehicular Networking Conference (IEEE VNC) since 2009. He serves as an associate editor for IEEE ITS Magazine, IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Vehicles and in the editorial board of Connected Vehicles Series of IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology. He is an IEEE VTS Distinguished Lecturer.


TUT04: 2020: Towards Practicle Quantum Computing

Presenters: Angela Sara Cacciapuoti, Marcello Caleffi

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

Very recently, researchers worldwide have started to devote massive efforts in designing and implementing quantum computation, with 17-qubit computing processors already prototyped and several groups making very fast progress towards the 50-qubit regime. Nevertheless, to fully unleash the ultimate vision of the quantum revolution, i.e., distributed quantum computing, it is necessary to design and to implement quantum networks, able to connect distant remote quantum processors through quantum entanglement. Despite the tremendous progress of quantum technologies, long-distance efficient entanglement distribution still constitutes a key issue, and several key research issues must be addressed to design and eventually deploy quantum networks. Hence, this tutorial aims at providing the participants with a wide view about the unique challenges for designing quantum networks.

Angela Sara Cacciapuoti received the Ph.D. degree in Electronic and Telecommunications Engineering in 2009, and the 'Laurea' (integrated BS/MS) summa cum laude (highest score) in Telecommunications Engineering in 2005, both from the University of Naples Federico II. Since April 2017, she held the Italian National Habilitation as “Associate Professor” in Telecommunications Engineering. From 2012 to 2017, she has been a non-tenured Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, University of Naples Federico II. She also was a visiting researcher at the Broadband Wireless Networking Laboratory, Georgia Institute of Technology (USA) and at the NaNoNetworking Center in Catalunya (N3Cat), Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (Spain). Her current research interests are in Cognitive Radio Networks, 5G Networks, and Quantum Communications. She authored over forty refereed papers in the first tier IEEE journals and the ComSoc flagship conferences and she received multiple awards including most cited article awards. She served as journal Guest Co-Editor for different special issues and on the technical program committee of several leading IEEE conferences in wireless communications and networking. Currently she serves as Editor for the journals: IEEE Trans. on Communications, IEEE Communications Letters and Computer Networks (Elsevier) Journal; moreover, she serves as Associate Editor for IEEE Access. In 2016 she was elevated to IEEE Senior Member. Since April 2016, she is an appointed member of the IEEE ComSoc Young Professionals Standing Committee. In February 2017, she has been appointed Award Co-Chair of the N2Women Board. In July 2017, she has been elected Treasurer of the IEEE Women in Engineering (WIE) Affinity Group (AG) of the IEEE Italy Section.

Marcello Caleffi received the Dr. Eng. degree summa cum laude (highest score) in computer science engineering from the University of Lecce, Lecce, Italy, in 2005, and the Ph.D. degree in electronic and telecommunications engineering from the University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy, in 2009. Currently, he is with the National Laboratory of Multimedia Communications, National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications (CNIT), and with the DIETI Department, University of Naples Federico II. Since April 2017, he held the Italian national habilitation as Associate Professor in Telecommunications Engineering. He was also with the Broadband Wireless Networking Laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, as visiting researcher. He was also with the NaNoNetworking Center in Catalunya (N3Cat) at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, as visiting researcher.His work appeared in several premier IEEE Transactions and Journals, and he received multiple awards, including best strategy award, most downloaded article awards and most cited article awards. Currently, he serves as an Editor for the IEEE Communications Letters and Elsevier Ad Hoc Networks; moreover, he serves as an Associate Technical Editor for the IEEE Communications Magazine. He has served as the chair, the TPC chair, the session chair, and the TPC member for several premier IEEE conferences. In 2016, he was elevated to IEEE Senior Member, and in 2017 he has been appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer from the IEEE Computer Society.


TUT05:Internet of Everything

Presenter: Ozgur B. Akan

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 8:30 am-12:30 pm

Internet of Everything (IoE), the seamless interconnection and autonomous coordination of massive number of computing elements, animate and inanimate entities, people, processes and data through the Internet infrastructure, is an emerging research direction towards enabling the Connected Universe from single molecules to vehicles and people. The realization of IoE demands novel engineering solutions to overcome the unique connectivity, spectrum scarcity, miniaturization, interoperability, and energy-efficiency challenges. In this talk, an overview of the most recent studies to address the fundamental challenges of IoE will be presented along with a discussion of future research directions. The talk will cover the advancements in 5G Internet of Things, which targets the ubiquitous connectivity and bandwidth scarcity challenges of IoE. Moreover, a recently emerged ICT framework named the Internet of Bio-Nano Things (IoBNT) will be introduced. Challenges in implementing IoBNT will be discussed with an overview of planned work on nanonetworks, bio-cyber interfaces, and human body molecular networks. Furthermore, the vision towards implementing the Internet of Energy, Internet of Vehicles/Drones, Internet of Sensors, Industrial Internet of Things, Internet of People/Senses/Social Sensors, Internet of Space and Internet of Money will be elaborated.  The concept of IoE builds upon the vision of IoT, which is one of the hottest recent research directions. IoE, apart from the concept of IoT, envisions to connect to internet existing networks that have so far been excluded from contemplation, such as molecular networks that thrive in any living organism including humans. The advances in technology have brought about the consideration of interfacing our existing technologies with so far evasive networks, and more and more funding is attributed to such directions, both from industrial and governmental agencies. The task at hand requires the involvement of people with expertise from many different disciplines, including but not limited to, engineering, material sciences, chemistry, biology, physics, and mathematics. I think it is time to incorporate younger generations from these disciplines with such ideas of exploring and connecting to these evasive networks. Thus, we aim at recruiting young undergraduate and graduate students, from disciplines listed above to contemplate upon such ideas and initiate them in research towards enriching the concept of internet by hooking it to existing natural networks so far beyond our reach. The interest from many overarching funding agencies towards this direction justifies our call for the young generation to commit their scientific endeavor into such research.

Prof Ozgur B. Akan is the Head of the Internet of Everything (IoE) Group at the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge. His research interests are in Internet of Everything, theoretical and experimental research on nanoscale, molecular, and neural communications, cyber-physical systems, 5G and THz wireless mobile networks, distributed social sensing, and cognitive radio and sensor networks. He is an IEEE Fellow, an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications, IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, IET Communications, and Nano Communication Networks Journal (Elsevier). He served as the General Co-Chair for IEEE INFOCOM 2017, ACM MobiCom 2012 and IEEE MoNaCom 2012, and TPC Co-Chair for ACM NanoCom 2014. He is the author of more than 230 articles in the field of next-generation communication technologies (with 8900+ citations, H-index of 45). He is an IEEE Nanotechnology Council Distinguished Lecturer (2017-) and IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer (2011-2013). He received IBM Shared University Research (SUR) Award 2011, IEEE ComSoc 2010 Outstanding Young Researcher Award, IBM Faculty Award (2008-2010). He is awarded ERC Consolidator Grant for 2014-2019, and ERC Proof of Concept (PoC) Grant in 2017; and the total amount of research funding he has received so far exceeds 5M Euros


TUT06: A Crash Course in Stochastic Geometry-Based Modeling and Analysis of 5G Cellular Networks

Presenter: Ekram Hossain

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

For more than three decades, stochastic geometry has been used to model large-scale ad hoc wireless networks, and develop tractable models to characterize and better understand the performance of these networks. Recently, stochastic geometry models have been shown to provide tractable and accurate performance bounds for cellular wireless networks including multi-tier and cognitive cellular networks, underlay device-to-device (D2D) communications, energy harvesting-based communication, coordinated multipoint transmission (CoMP) transmissions, full-duplex (FD) communications, etc. These technologies will enable the evolving fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. Stochastic geometry, the theory of point processes in particular, can capture the location-dependent interactions among the coexisting network entities. It provides a rich set of mathematical tools to model and analyze cellular networks with different types of cells (e.g., macro cell, micro cell, pico cell, or femto cell) with different characteristics (i.e., transmission power, cognition capabilities, etc.) in terms of several key performance indicators such as SINR coverage probability, link capacity, and network capacity. For analysis and design of interference avoidance and management techniques in such multi-tier cellular networks (which are also referred to as small cell networks or HetNets), rigorous yet simple interference models are required. However, interference modeling has always been a challenging problem even in the traditional single-tier cellular networks. For interference characterization, assuming that the deployment of the base stations (BSs) in a cellular network follows a regular grid (e.g., the traditional hexagonal grid model) leads to either intractable results which require massive Monte Carlo simulation or inaccurate results due to unrealistic assumptions (e.g., Wyner model). Moreover, due to the variation of the capacity (both network and link capacities) demands across the service area (e.g., downtowns, residential areas, parks, sub-urban and rural areas), the BSs will not exactly follow a grid based model. That is, for snapshots of a cellular network at different locations, the positions of the BSs with respect to (w.r.t.) each other will have random patterns. By capturing the spatial randomness of the BSs as well as network entities including network users, stochastic geometry analysis provides general and topology-independent results. When applied to networks modeled as spatial Poisson point processes (PPPs) with Rayleigh fading, simple closed-form expressions can be obtained which help us to better understand the network performance behavior in response to the variations in design parameters. Stochastic geometry based analysis and optimization of future generation cellular networks is a very fertile area of research and has recently attracted significant interest from the research community. The aim of this tutorial is to provide an extensive overview of the stochastic geometry modeling approach for next-generation cellular networks, and the state-of-the-art research on this topic. After motivating the requirement for spatial modeling for the evolving 5G cellular networks, it will introduce the basics of stochastic geometry modeling tools and the related mathematical preliminaries. Then, it will present a comprehensive survey on the literature related to stochastic geometry models for single-tier as well as multi-tier and cognitive cellular wireless networks, underlay D2D communication, and cognitive and energy harvesting D2D communication. It will also present a taxonomy of the stochastic geometry modeling approaches based on the target network model, the point process used, and the performance evaluation technique. Finally, it will discuss the open research challenges and future research directions. 

Ekram Hossain (F’15) is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. He is a Member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada. His current research interests include modeling, design, and analysis of wireless networks with emphasis on 5G cellular networks, cooperative and cognitive wireless systems, and green radio communications. He has authored/edited a number of books in these areas (http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/⇠hossaina). He is a highly cited researcher with citation count > 18, 500 in Google Scholar and h-index of 68. He has presented numerous tutorials and invited talks on the above topics (which include tutorials in IEEE ICC, Globecom, WCNC, PIMRC, and VTC). Dr. Hossain served as the served as the Editor-in-Chief for the IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, an Area Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications (2009-2011), and an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing (2007-2012). Currently he is an Editor for IEEE Wireless Communications. Also, he is a member of the IEEE Press Editorial Board. He was a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Communications Society (2012-2015) and is currently a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society for the term 2016-2017.


TUT07:  Bayesian-inspired methods for sparse signal recovery-Brand new theoretical insights and applications to wireless communications

Presenter: Chandra R. Murthy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

The emergence of compressive sensing and the associated l1 recovery algorithms and theory have generated considerable excitement and interest in their application. This tutorial will examine more recent developments and a complementary set of tools based on a Bayesian framework to address the general problem of sparse signal recovery and the challenges associated with it. The Bayesian methods offer excellent performance and have the flexibility necessary to deal with more general scenarios that often arise in communications related applications. Towards understanding the surprising effectiveness of Bayesian methods, we will discuss the performance of M-SBL, a Bayesian method. We will show that, in the multiple measurement vector setup, it can recover the correct support with arbitrarily high probability with O(k1/2 (log n)3/2) measurements per vector, where k is the sparsity level and n is the ambient dimension of the sparse vector. This is a significant improvement over conventional methods, where the best available result is O(k log n). In the process, we will introduce powerful results from linear algebra and statistics such as the matrix Kantrovich inequalities, the Hanson-Wright inequality, and related concentration results. Further, by re-interpreting the Bayesian cost function as way to perform covariance matching, we show that one can develop new, ultra-fast Bayesian algorithms for sparse signal recovery. Finally, we will discuss the utility of these algorithms in the context of 5G communications with several case studies including wideband channel estimation, mmWave beam selection, signal recovery in index modulation schemes, etc.   

Chandra R. Murthy received the B.Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 1998, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University and the University of California, San Diego, in 2000 and 2006, respectively. From 2000 to 2002, he was at Qualcomm Inc., where he worked on WCDMA baseband transceiver design and 802.11b baseband receivers. From Aug. 2006 to Aug. 2007, he worked as a staff engineer at Beceem Communications Inc. on advanced receiver architectures for the 802.16e Mobile WiMAX standard. In Sept. 2007, he joined as a faculty at the Department of Electrical Communication Engineering at the Indian Institute of Science, where he is currently working as an Associate Professor. His research interests are in the areas of 5G techniques, energy harvesting communications, and sparse signal recovery. He has 47 journal papers and 82 conference papers to his credit. His paper titled “Joint Approximately Group Sparse Channel Estimation and Data Detection in MIMO-OFDM Systems Using Sparse Bayesian Learning” won the best paper award in the National Conference on Communications, held at IIT Kanpur, India, in Feb. 2014. He served as an associate editor for the IEEE Signal Processing Letters during 2012-15. He is currently serving as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, IEEE Transactions on Communications, and Sadhana, and is an elected member of the IEEE SPCOM Technical Committee for the years 2017-19.


TUT08:  Network Localization and Navigation: fundamental limits, cooperative algorithms, and network experimentation

Presenter: Moe Z. Win, Andrea Conti

The availability of real-time high-accuracy location awareness is essential for current and future wireless applications, particularly for the Internet of Things and 5G networks. Reliable localization and navigation is a critical component for a diverse set of applications including connected communities, smart cities, home automation, logistics, asset tracking, medical services, vehicle autonomy, military systems, as well as a large set of emerging wireless sensor network applications. The coming years will see the emergence of network localization and navigation in challenging environments with sub-meter accuracy and minimal infrastructure requirements. We will first cover four basic components of traditional positioning: ranging techniques (e.g., time-of-arrival, received signal strength); positioning algorithms (e.g., least-squares, maximum likelihood); performance bounds (Fisher information inequality); and network experimentation (for characterization of cooperative localization) in real environments. Secondly, we will discuss the limitations of traditional positioning, and move on to the key enablers for high-accuracy location awareness: wideband transmission and cooperative processing. We will cover fundamental bounds, cooperative algorithms, and network experimentation. Fundamental bounds serve as performance benchmarks, and as a tool for network design. Cooperative algorithms are a way to achieve drastic performance improvements with respect to traditional non-cooperative positioning. To harness these benefits, system designers must consider realistic operational settings; thus, we have performed extensive measurement campaigns with wideband radios.

Moe Win is a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to joining MIT, he was at AT&T Research Laboratories for five years and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for seven years. His research encompasses fundamental theories, algorithm design, and experimentation for a broad range of real-world problems. His current research topics include network localization and navigation, network interference exploitation, intrinsic wireless secrecy, adaptive diversity techniques, ultrawide bandwidth systems, optical transmission systems, and space communications systems. Professor Win is an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communications Society Board of Governors (2011—2013). He was the Chair (2005—2006) and Secretary (2003—2004) for the Radio Communications Committee of the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Win is currently an Editor-at-Large for the WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS. He served as Editor (2006—2012) for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, and as Area Editor (2003—2006) and Editor (1998—2006) for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS. He was honored with two IEEE Technical Field Awards: the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award and the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. He received the IEEE Communications Society Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the International Prize for Communications Cristoforo Colombo, Copernicus Fellowship, the Royal Academy of Engineering Distinguished Visiting Fellowship, the Fulbright Fellowship, the Laurea Honoris Causa from the University of Ferrara, the Technical Recognition Award of the IEEE ComSoc Radio Communications Committee, and the U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Professor Win is elected Fellow of the AAAS, the IEEE, and the IET, and was an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.

Andrea Conti is an Associate Professor at the University of Ferrara. He was researcher at CNIT (1999—2002) and at IEIIT/CNR (2002—2005) with the Research Unit of Bologna. In Summer 2001, he was with the Wireless Systems Research De-partment at AT&T Research Laboratories. Since 2003, he has been a frequent visitor to the Wireless Communication and Network Sciences Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he presently holds the Research Affiliate appointment. He is a coauthor of Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks: Enabling Technologies, Information Processing and Protocol Design (Elsevier, 2008). His research interests involve theory and experimentation of wireless systems and networks including network localization and navigation, adaptive diversity communications, network secrecy, and random sampling. He is recipient of the HTE Puskás Tivadar Medal and co-recipient of the IEEE Communications Society’s Stephen O. Rice Prize and the IEEE Communications Society’s Fred W. Ellersick Prize. Dr. Conti served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, for the IEEE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, and for the for the IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS. He organized and chaired a number of IEEE conferences. He was elected Chair (2013—2014), Vice-Chair (2011—2012), and Secretary (2009—2010) of the IEEE Communications Society’s Radio Communications Technical Committee. He is an elected Fellow of the IET and has been selected as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.


TUT09:5G Network Slicing: Concepts, Use Cases, Solutions & Practice

Presenters:

Marco Di Renzo, Paris-Saclay University / CNRS, Paris, France.

Konstantinos Samdanis, Huawei EUROPEAN Research Center, Munich, Germany.

Vincenzo Sciancalepore, NEC Europe Ltd., Heidelberg, Germany.

Fabrizio Granelli, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

Network slicing is expected to introduce new business opportunities in 5G networks opening new service horizons for verticals, virtual operators and application providers, i.e. for 3rd players without a networking infrastructure. Network slicing facilitates multiple logical self-contained  networks on top of a common physical infrastructure platform enabling a flexible stakeholder ecosystem that allows technical and business innovation integrating physical and/or logical network and cloud resources into a programmable, open software-oriented multi-tenant network environment. This tutorial focuses on the evolutionary flow of the network virtualization and network slicing operations through several standard definition activities in the last decade. In particular, we shed light on how network slicing operations become feasible in the next generation mobile networks by boiling down the overall overhead and complexity of a full network deployment. We analyze the state-of-the-art solutions proposed to realize the first example of network slicing, highlighting the hardware limitations of the current solutions and the real potentiality of advanced virtualization approaches. We also provide the audience with a solid background and comprehensive description of stochastic geometry modeling, by introducing key theorems, by explaining how to formulate problems from the standpoint of system-level analysis and optimization, as well as by illustrating how to use stochastic geometry for modeling and analyzing cellular networks based on the novel concept of multi tenancy network slicing. Finally, we point out the future research directions to embrace new open-source function/resource allocation procedures.

Marco Di Renzo received the Laurea (cum laude) and the Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Information Engineering from the Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of L’Aquila, Italy, in April 2003 and in January 2007, respectively. In October 2013, he received the Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches (Doctor of Science) degree from the University Paris-Sud, Paris, France. He has held several research and academic positions in Italy at the University of L’Aquila, in the USA at Virginia Tech, in Spain at CTTC, and in the UK at The University of Edinburgh. Since 2010, he has been a CNRS Associate Professor (“Chargé de Recherche Titulaire CNRS”) in the Laboratory of Signals and Systems of Paris-Saclay University — CNRS, CentraleSupélec, Univ Paris Sud, France. He is a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Communications Society and IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. He serves as the Associate Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Communications Letters and as an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Communications and IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications. He has received several research awards, including the 2013 Network of Excellence NEWCOM# Best Paper Award; the 2013 IEEE-COMSOC Best Young Researcher Award for Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA Region); the 2014 Royal Academy of Engineering Distinguished Visiting Fellowship, United Kingdom; the 2015 IEEE Jack Neubauer Memorial Award; the 2015-2018 CNRS Award for Excellence in Research and in Advising Doctoral Students; the 2016 Marie Curie Global Fellowship (declined); and the 2017 SEE-IEEE Alain Glavieux Award.

Konstantinos Samdanis received his Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees in mobile communications from Kings College London. He is a senior researcher and a backhaul standardization specialist with NEC Europe, Germany. Konstantinos is active in 5G NORMA H2020 in the area of network architecture and orchestration, and is also involved in standardization for broadband converged networks (BBF) for 5G and 3GPP SA2 NextGen in the area of network slicing. In the past Konstantinos provided a series of tutorials on energy efficiency and green communication in a number of IEEE conferences including VTC, CCNC, NOMS, etc. and invited talks/summer school seminars on the same topic, while he is the editor of the Green Communications: Principles, Concepts and Practice book from Wiley.

Vincenzo Sciancalepore is a Researcher and RAN specialist at NEC Europe Ltd., Germany. He is currently focusing his activity in the area of network virtualization and network slicing challenges. He has been involved in a number of European Projects and several published international research papers as well as patents. He is actively participating to a 5GPP project, namely 5G NORMA, leading a working task on virtual network function orchestration topics. He received his M.Sc. degree in Telecommunications Engineering and Telematics Engineering in 2011 and 2012, respectively, whereas in 2015, he received a double Ph.D. degree from Politecnico di Milano and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. From 2011 to 2015 he was Research Assistant at IMDEA Networks, focusing on inter-cell coordinated scheduling for LTE Advanced networks and device-to-device communication. He was also the recipient of the national award for the best Ph.D. thesis in the area of communication technologies (Wireless and Networking) issued by GTTI in 2015.

Fabrizio Granelli received his M.Sc. degree (Laurea) cum laude and Ph.D. in Telecommunications Engineering from University of Genoa (Italy), in 1997 and 2001, respectively. Since 2000, he was with the University of Trento (Italy), currently as Associate Professor and Dean of Education of the Department of Information Engineering and Computer Science. He is an active IEEE/Communications Society volunteer, currently Director of OnLine Content and Secretary of the Transmission, Access and Optical Systems Technical Committee of ComSoc. He was IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecturer for two terms (2012- 2015). He is the author of more than 170 papers on networking, smart grid communications, green and virtualized networks, published on top-level international journals and conferences.


TUT10: Measurement and modeling of mm-wave propagation channels

Presenter: Andreas F. Molisch

Sunday, 20 May 2018: 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

Millimeter-wave frequency bands will play an important role in next-generation wireless (including military) communications (5G) communications systems due to the enormous amount of available bandwidth in this frequency range. For the design, performance assessment, and deployment planning of wireless systems, understanding of the propagation mechanisms and creation of suitable channel models is a conditio sine qua non. For mm-wave systems, measurement and modeling of the corresponding propagation channels is thus of the utmost interest, particularly including narrowband, wideband, and directional (MIMO) sounding techniques; (ii) ray tracing, (iii) channel measurement results available in the literature, both for indoor and outdoor channels, and (iv) channel models, including  tapped delay line, geometry-based stochastic, and quasi-deterministic models.

Andreas F. Molisch is the Solomon Golomb — Andrew and Erna ViterbiChair Professor at the University of Southern California. He previously was at TU Vienna, AT&T (Bell) Labs, Lund University, and Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs. His research interest is wireless communications, with emphasis on wireless propagation channels, multi-antenna systems, ultrawideband signaling and localization, novel modulation methods, and caching for wireless content distribution. He is the author of four books, 19 book chapters, more than 200 journal papers, 300 conference papers, as well as 80 patents and 70 standards contributions. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, IEEE, AAAS, and IET, as well as Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and recipient of numerous awards. He has been the chair or major contributor in many channel measurement and modeling groups, including the channel measurement/modeling groups of COST 259, COST 273, IEEE 802.15.3a, IEEE 802.15.4a, IEEE 802.11n, 3GPP SCM, 5GSCM, and the NIST 5G mmWave Alliance.


TUT11: A First‐Principles Approach to Computer Networking (FPCN)

Presenter: Joe Touch

“You told me to go back to the beginning... so I have.” — Inigo Montoya, quoting Vizzini’s advice, from the movie the Princess Bride

Vizzini was right: when in doubt, it can be useful to revisit origins. This tutorial presents a new “first principles” approach to computer networking now being taught at USC. It is based on fundamental principles that evolved from USC/ISI’s experience developing virtual networks and recursive networking. Past approaches focus on a protocol architecture that was developed in the 1970s by the international organization of telephone companies (the ITU) called Open Systems Interconnect (OSI). The OSI model was never widely deployed, yet it remains the basis of our network teaching. It describes a seven‐layer architecture, but why those seven? Why exactly seven? Most computer networking texts explore past and present examples of networks by either assembling them bottom‐up or disassembling them topdown. This tutorial explains a new approach to presenting computer networking that goes beyond construction and destruction towards fundamental understanding. This tutorial is only very recently available; its deck has been distilled from 1,900 course slides used at USC and UCLA, having been refined over the four semesters and is currently in development as a textbook. It represents a fresh way to approach computer networking derived from basic concepts from information theory and physics. It incorporates the Internet as a degenerate case while uniquely unifying layering, relaying, and layering — while natively supporting many of the advanced techniques that have emerged in the past decade (e.g., encapsulation subnets like TRILL and LISP, multilayer encapsulation tunnels, and other forms of network virtualization). The method presented in this tutorial is intended as a new way to present computer networking to typical undergraduate CS or EE students. Because of the breadth and speed of which the overview is presented, familiarity with basic communication, networking, and computation concepts is expected. Attendees will be expected to have a basic understanding of computer networking, similar to that of a typical upper division (junior/senior) undergraduate course in computer networks.

Joe Touch recently joined the Aerospace Corporation as its Senior Distributed Systems Data Architect and also serves as an independent consultant. He was previously with the University of Southern California’s (USC) Information Sciences Institute for over 25 years, most recently as its Postel Center Director a Research Associate Professor in USC's Computer Science and EE/Systems Departments. He received a B.S. in biophysics and CS from the Univ. of Scranton in 1985, an M.S. in CS from Cornell Univ. in 1987, and a Ph.D. in CS from the Univ. of Pennsylvania in 1992. His interests include network and distributed systems architecture, virtual networks, optical computing, optical communication processing, and high‐performance network security. He holds 5 US patents and has published over 150 papers in conferences and journals. Joe is in Sigma Xi, an ACM Distinguished Scientist, an IEEE Senior Member and Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer, and an OSA Senior Member, Traveling Lecturer, and Nonlinear Optics TG chair. He is active in the IETF in the Transport, Internet, and Security Areas, and served on numerous conference committees. His “first principles approach to computer networking” course, which forms the basis of this lecture, is based on his Recursive Network Architecture and is under development as a textbook and has been taught at both USC and UCLA.


TUT12: Terahertz Wireless Communications: A Key Enabling Technology for Beyond 5G

Presenter: Josep M. Jornet and Chong Han

Terahertz (THz)-band (0.1-10 THz) communication is envisioned as a key wireless technology of the next decade. The THz band will help overcome the spectrum scarcity problems and capacity limitations of current wireless networks, by providing an unprecedentedly large bandwidth. In addition, THz-band communication will enable a plethora of long-awaited applications, both at the nano-scale and at the macroscale, ranging from wireless massive-core computing architectures and instantaneous data transfer among non-invasive nano-devices, to ultra-high-definition content streaming among mobile devices and wireless high-bandwidth secure communications. The objective of this course is to provide the audience with the necessary knowledge and tools to contribute to the development of wireless communication networks in the THz band. THz technology has been recently identified by DARPA as “one of the four major research areas that could eventually have an impact on our society larger than that of the Internet itself”. The THz band opens the door to a plethora of applications in very diverse domains, ranging from Terabit Wireless Personal and Local Area Networks to wireless nanosensor networks or the Internet of Nano-Things. In this context, the development of a new communication and networking technology to support networks with “billions of connected nanosystems” has been recently identified as “one of the four essential components of the next IT revolution” by the Semiconductor Research Consortium and the US National Science Foundation. Nonetheless, the THz band, which lies in between mm-waves and the far infrared, remains still one of the least explored regions in the EM spectrum. For many decades, the lack of compact high-power signal sources and high-sensitivity detectors able to work at room temperature has hampered the use of the THz band for any application beyond sensing. However, many recent advancements with different technologies is finally closing the so-called THz gap. THz-band communication brings many new opportunities to the wireless communication community. The THz band supports huge transmission bandwidths, which range from almost 10 THz for distances below one meter, to multiple transmission windows, each tens to hundreds of GHz wide, for distances in the order of a few tens of meters. Nevertheless, this very large bandwidth comes at the cost of a very high propagation loss, mainly because of molecular absorption, which also creates a unique distance dependence on the available bandwidth. All these introduce many challenges to practical THz communication systems and require the development of innovative solutions. Moreover, many of these might be helpful for broadband wireless communication systems below and above the THz band, i.e., mm-waves and optical wireless communications, respectively. Through this tutorial, the audience will learn the necessary knowledge to work in the cutting-edge research field of THz band communications. The state-of-the-art technologies, the open challenges, and possible research directions in the following three aspects are covered in this tutorial. First, THz-band devices will be surveyed, including THz-band transceivers, broadband antennas and dynamic antenna arrays. Second, existing THz-band channel models, including line-of-sight channel, multi-path channel and three2 dimensional channel, will be described. The open research challenges of the Ultra-Massive Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (UM-MIMO) channel and the time-varying channel will be introduced. Third, novel communication mechanisms such as the pulse-based modulation, multi-wideband modulation, distanceaware resource allocation, low-sampling-rate timing acquisition, and UM-MIMO adaptive systems will be presented.

Josep M. Jornet is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York. He received the B.S. in Telecommunication Engineering and the M.Sc. in Information and Communication Technologies from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain, in 2008. He received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), Atlanta, GA, in 2013. From September 2007 to December 2008, he was a visiting researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, under the MIT Sea Grant program. He was the recipient of the Oscar P. Cleaver Award for outstanding graduate students in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, at Georgia Tech in 2009. He also received the Broadband Wireless Networking Lab Researcher of the Year Award in 2010. In 2016 and 2017, he received the Distinguished TPC Member Award at the IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM). In 2017, he received the IEEE Communications Society Young Professional Best Innovation Award. Since July 2016, he is the Editor-in-Chief of the Nano Communication Networks (Elsevier) Journal. He also serves in the Steering Committee of the ACM Nanoscale Computing and Communications Conference series. He is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. His current research interests are in Terahertz-band communication networks, Nano-photonic wireless communication, Intra-body Wireless Nanosensor Networks and the Internet of Nano-Things.

Chong Han is currently an Assistant Professor with the University of Michigan—Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China, since June 2016. He received the Bachelor of Engineering degree in Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia, in 2011. He obtained the Master of Science and the Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA, in 2012 and 2016, respectively. His current research interests include Terahertz Band Communication Networks, Electromagnetic Nanonetworks, 5G Cellular Networks, Graphene-enabled Wireless Communications. He is a member of the IEEE.


TUT13:Complex Systems Science meets 5G and IoT Networks

Presenters: M. Majid Butt; Irene Macaluso; Nicola Marchetti

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 8:30 am -12:30 pm

The main goal of the tutorial is to introduce the audience to a framework that draws on concepts from information theory and complex systems science to underpin a new approach to communication networks. The tutorial will introduce agent-based modelling as a tool to analyse the interactions that shape network and graph theory abstractions on which new metrics that holistically describe a network (e.g., excess entropy, signalling complexity, neural complexity) will be derived.

 The complex systems science inspired metrics will be linked to overall network performance (e.g. robustness, scalability, energy efficiency). In order to maximize the relevance of our framework to the telecom research and industry communities, the scenarios and use cases we will discuss are rooted in the most relevant, near-future architectures and use cases in 5G communication networks, such as dense small cell deployments, distributed computing in the Internet of Things, network function virtualization (NFV).

Dr. Majid Butt received PhD and MS degrees in telecommunication from Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway and Christian Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany, respectively. He is Assistant Professor at University of Glasgow, UK. Before that, he has held senior researcher positions at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and Qatar University. He is recipient of Marie curie Alain Bensoussan postdoctoral fellowship from European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM). He held ERCIM postdoc fellow positions at Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute, Germany, and interdisciplinary center for research in Security, Reliability and Trust at University of Luxembourg.  Dr. Majid’s major areas of research interest include communication techniques for wireless networks with special focus on radio resource allocation, scheduling algorithms, cooperative communications, cross layer design, energy harvesting and green communication techniques. He has authored more than 40 peer reviewed conference and journal publications in these areas. He is a senior member of IEEE and serves as an associate editor for IEEE Access journal and IEEE communication magazine since 2016.

Dr Irene Macaluso is a Senior Research Fellow at CONNECT, Ireland’s research centre for Future Networks and Communications, based at Trinity College, Dublin. Dr. Macaluso received her Ph.D. in Robotics from the University of Palermo in 2007. Dr. Macaluso’s current research interests are in the area of adaptive wireless resource allocation, with particular focus on the design and analysis of market-based mechanisms in the management and operation of reconfigurable wireless networks and the application of machine learning to radio resource sharing. She has published more than 50 papers in internationally peer reviewed journals and conferences. She is Executive Editor of Transactions on Emerging Telecommunication Technologies (ETT) since 2016.

Dr Nicola Marchetti is Assistant Professor in Wireless Communications at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, and is a senior researcher of CONNECT / The Centre for Future Networks and Communications. Prof. Marchetti has an education in math and signal processing. He received the Ph.D. in Wireless Communications from Aalborg University, Denmark in 2007, and the M.Sc. in Electronic Engineering from University of Ferrara, Italy in 2003. He also holds a M.Sc. in Mathematics which he received from Aalborg University in 2010. His former and current collaborations include research projects in cooperation with Samsung, Nokia Siemens Networks, Huawei, Intel Mobile Communications among others. His research interests include: 5G Wireless Communication Systems, Cognitive Radio and Dynamic Spectrum Access, Complex Systems Science, Integrated Optical-Wireless Networks, Massive MIMO Systems, Radio Resource Management, Ultra Dense Networks, and Waveforms. Prof Marchetti has a growing reputation in 5G and has been one of the lead PIs in several EU and industrial projects, e.g. the FP7 ADEL (Advanced Dynamic Spectrum 5G mobile networks Employing Licensed shared access) and NSN Long Term Research project. He authored in excess of 90 journals and conference papers, holds 2 patents, and wrote 2 books and 6 book chapters. He is presently supervising 6 post-docs, 7 PhD students, and supervised one postdoc and 6 PhD students till completion in the past. He won 4 best paper awards at international conferences (including IEEE ICC 2016), gave 1 keynote speech and 14 invited talks, and is an IEEE Senior Member.


TUT14: Spectrum and Energy Efficiency in 5G Mobile Data Networks

Presenters: Guowang Miao, KTH

Geoffrey Li, Georgia Tech

Ender Ayanoglu, University of California, Irvine

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 8:30 am -12:30 pm

The future success of communication networks hinges on the ability to overcome the mismatch between requested quality of service and limited network resources. Spectrum is a natural resource that cannot be replenished and therefore must be used efficiently. This makes spectrum efficiency to be very important for communication systems. Communications engineers have developed many techniques to maximize spectral efficiency. On the other hand, battery technology has not kept up with the growing requirements stemming from ubiquitous multimedia and MTC applications. From a global perspective, we are confronted with extremely severe challenges on environment protection and prevention of climate change, increasingly for the information and communication technologies. Therefore, energy efficiency of wireless networks is also becoming more and more important. This tutorial introduces cutting-edge cross-layer technologies to improve both spectral efficiency and energy efficiency of mobile data networks from different perspectives. Our focus is to introduce state-of-the-art spectrum and energy efficient communication technologies for both single- and multi-user networks. Our treatment will cover both centralized and distributed wireless networks. We will discuss in detail the relation between spectral efficiency and energy efficiency in different types of wireless networks and introduce new guidelines that will significantly improve spectral efficiency and energy efficiency for future network design. We will then concentrate on mobile data networks. With the upcoming Fifth Generation (5G) cellular standard and the expected tremendous increase in network traffic, these networks will become even more important than today. It is already known that today’s cellular networks are not energy-efficient. After revealing the causes of energy inefficiency in today’s networks, we will introduce a large number of techniques, applicable across several layers of the communications hierarchy, that have demonstrated substantial improvement in energy and spectral efficiency. We will discuss techniques to jointly optimize spectral and energy efficiency in such networks.

Guowang Miao is an associate professor in KTH. He has founded freelinguist.com, an AI-enabled cloud platform for you to connect with native linguists for quality language services such as translation, editing, and writing. He once worked in Intel Labs as a research engineer and in Samsung Research America as a senior standard engineer and a 3GPP LTE-A delegate. In 2011, he won an Individual Gold Award from Samsung Research America for his contributions in LTE-A standardization. His research interest is in the design of mobile communications and networking. He is the main inventor of energy efficient scheduling and capacity-approaching transmission (United States Patent 7782829). He has delivered many tutorials on energy efficiency related topics at major conferences. He is the lead author of the graduate textbook entitled Fundamentals of Mobile Data Networks and the book entitled Energy and Spectrum Efficient Wireless Network Design (Cambridge University Press). He has authored over 90 research papers in premier journals or conferences. So far, 40% of his first-author journal papers are ESI highly cited. He has had several patents granted and many more filed. Several of his patented technologies have been adopted as essential in 4G standards. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Tsinghua University and Georgia Institute of Technology respectively.

Geoffrey Ye Li is a Professor with Georgia Tech. His general research is in signal processing and mahine learning for wireless communications. In these areas, he has published over 400 articles with around 30,000 citations. He has been listed as a Highly-Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters. He has been an IEEE Fellow since 2006. He won 2010 Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award and 2017 Award for Advances in Communication from the IEEE Communications Society, 2013 James Evans Avant Garde Award and 2014 Jack Neubauer Memorial Award from the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society, and 2015 Distinguished ECE Faculty Achievement Award from Georgia Tech. He has provided tutorials at IEEE Globecom, ICC, VTC, WCNC, and PIMRC for over 20 times.

Ender Ayanoglu received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University 1982 and 1986. He was with Bell Laboratories until 1999. During 1999-2002, he was a Systems Architect at Cisco Systems, Inc. Since 2002, he has been a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Irvine, where he served as the Director of the Center for Pervasive Communications and Computing and held the Conexant-Broadcom Endowed Chair during 2002-2010. During 2000-2001, he served as the founding chair of the IEEE-ISTO Broadband Wireless Internet Forum (BWIF), an industry standards organization which developed a broadband wireless system employing Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) and a Medium Access Control (MAC) algorithm that provides Quality-of-Service (QoS) guarantees, a precursor of today's Fourth Generation (4G) cellular wireless systems. During 1993-2014 he was an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Communications. He served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications during 2004-2007. Dr. Ayanoglu is currently serving as the Founding Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking. Dr. Ayanoglu is the recipient of the IEEE Communications Society Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award in 1995 and the IEEE Communications Society Best Tutorial Paper Award in 1997. He has been an IEEE Fellow since 1998.


TUT15: Sparse Signal Processing: Recent Advances and Applications in Wireless Communications

Presenters: Zhi Tian , Yue Wang

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 8:30 am -12:30 pm

Sparse signal processing has demonstrated its usefulness in wireless communications over the recent years. This tutorial is motivated by exciting resurgence of interest in the topic, which is propelled by both the latest theoretical and technological advances and emerging new applications. In the emerging era of data deluge, wireless systems such as 5G and Internet of Things (IoT) have to be able to sense and process an unprecedentedly large amount of data in real time, which render traditional communication and signal processing techniques inefficient or inapplicable. Meanwhile, there are exciting new developments on the theory and algorithms of sparse signal processing and compressive sensing, which offer powerful tools to effectively deal with high-dimensional signals, large-size problems, and big-volume data. In this tutorial, we will introduce basic concepts and recent results related to sparse signal processing, emphasizing recent new results on structure-based compressive sensing beyond sparsity, compressive covariance sensing and super-resolution gridless compressive sensing. Through ample examples, we will focus on employing sparse signal processing principles and techniques in various wireless applications, such as wideband spectrum sensing in cognitive radios, sparse channel estimation and noncoherent transmission for large-antenna arrays in both millimeter-wave communication systems and Internet-of-Things applications. Finally, we will discuss open research issues and future directions on this topic. Primary audiences include graduate students, researchers and research engineers with general interests in communications, signal processing, and specific interests in cognitive radio communications, open spectrum access, millimeter-wave communications, and IoT systems where signal and information acquisition costs are high. The general audience will get an overview of the general concepts and formulations, visions, and motivating applications of sparse signal processing and its various applications in modern communication systems. Researchers in this area will obtain in-depth understanding of key technical challenges, and learn the most recent advances and our novel approaches and insights on this topic.

Prof. Zhi Tian is a full professor at George Mason University, USA, since 2015. Previously she was on the faculty of Michigan Technological University for 14 years, and served a 3-year term as Program Director in the Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems at the US National Science Foundation. Her general research interests are in the areas of signal processing theory and algorithms, particularly for applications in wireless communications. Current research focuses on cognitive radio technology, millimeter-wave communications, wireless sensor networks, and large-scale data analytics. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, and has been actively involved in various IEEE activities in both the Communications and Signal Processing Societies. She is Vice Chair of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Big Data Special Interest Group, and was a member of the IEEE Signal Processing for Communications and Networking Technical Committee. She was a Distinguished Lecturer of both the IEEE Communications Society and the Vehicular Technology Society, and delivered a few keynote speeches and tutorials in international conferences. She served as Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing.

Dr. Yue Wang received the Ph.D. degree in Communication and Information Systems from the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, China, in 2011. From 2009 to 2011, he was a visiting Ph.D. student with the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) department of Michigan Technological University, USA. From 2011 to 2015, he worked as a Senior Engineer at Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., Beijing, China, where he was a technical lead on R&D projects related to compressive sensing for communications. Currently, he is a Postdoctoral Researcher with the ECE department of George Mason University, USA. His general interests are in the area of signal processing for wireless communications, with current focus on cognitive radio, massive MIMO, millimeter-wave communications, and sparse signal processing.


TUT16: Moving Target Defense (MTD): A Software Defined Networking (SDN) Approach

Presenters: Dijiang Huang

Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging research area that has attracted a lot of attention from academia, industry, and government. SDN packs in itself immense possibilities from supporting the creation of consolidated datacenters and better load balancing, to seamless mobility and secure networks. It is an innovation that allows us to control and program the network in a way to make it responsive to networking events, for example, events caused by security breaches, in a more proactive fashion. This tutorial seeks to enlighten and educate the reader about cyber maneuver or adaptive and intelligent cyber defense. Prior to implementing these proactive cyber defense techniques, or Moving Target Defense (MTD) schemes, it is important to analyze potential threats in an environment, detect attacks, and implement countermeasures in a way that makes expends attacker resources while preserving user experience. This tutorial discusses theory and tools to detect multi-stage attacks in an environment Lastly, modern computing paradigms such as Software-Defined Networks and Network Functions Virtualization (SDN-NFV) and their effectiveness in implementing these MTD responses are discussed. SDN approach separates control and data planes which improves optimization of network policies and by providing easy access to flow tables, it gives a real-time control over the network switches, allowing administrators to monitor and control the route of packets flowing through the network. Thus, the packets, which otherwise flow according to fixed and firmware defined security rules, can now be analyzed and controlled according to dynamic user defined rules. This traffic reshaping capability of SDN promises further developments in networking and allows exploitation of a true control over the traffic. One of the many applications of SDN can be in improving the security by controlling traffic flow in the network by redirecting the packets from a suspicious node to an inspection node where in-depth examination of these packets can be performed. SDN can help in implementation of other techniques for improving security in a Software Defined Infrastructure (SDI) cloud environment such as reconfiguring the network dynamically to enforce packet forwarding, blocking, redirection, reflection, changing of MAC or IP address, limiting the packet flow rate etc. These solutions can be considered as less intrusive alternative to security countermeasures taken at the host level, and offer centralized control of the distributed network. Continuing with this notion of security with SDN, in this tutorial, we will introduce the basic features of SDN technologies and explain how to deploy a secure cloud computing system based on SDN solutions. The technical areas that will be presented include: (1) software-based infrastructure, such as cloud computing, and security issues; (2) NFV and SDN security management architecture; and (3) an MTD security mechanisms based on SDN/NFV and case studies.

Dr. Huang received his Bachelor of Science degree in Telecommunications from Beijing University of Posts & Telecommunications, China. He received his Master of Science and PhD degrees from University of Missouri-Kansas City majored in Computer Science and Telecommunications. He is currently an associate professor in the School of Computing Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering. His research interests are in computer and network security, mobile ad hoc networks, network virtualization, and mobile cloud computing. Dr. Huang's research is supported by federal agencies NSF, ONR, ARO, and NATO, and organizations such as Consortium of Embedded System (CES), Kern Family Foundation, Hewlett-Packard, and China Mobile. He is a recipient of ONR Young Investigator Award and HP Innovation Research Program (IRP) Award. He is a co-founder of Athena Network Solutions LLC (ATHENETS) and CyNET LLC. He is currently leading the Secure Networking and Computing (SNAC) research group at ASU. Dr. Huang is an associate editor of the Journal of Network and System Management (JNSM) and an editor of the IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials. He has served as an organizer for many International conferences and workshops. He is a senior member of IEEE.


TUT17:Unlicensed spectrum technologies: From Wi-Fi to 5G and beyond

Presenters:Adrian Garcia-Rodriguez and Giovanni Geraci (Nokia Bell Labs, Ireland)

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 8:30 am -12:30 pm

A broad range of new technologies are being developed as mobile operators eye the unlicensed spectrum to address the exponential traffic growth. The omnipresent Wi-Fi is being upgraded to its latest flavour (802.11ax) to support uplink multi-user MIMO and achieve higher user throughputs. Moreover, Wi-Fi systems operating in the mmWave frequencies (802.11ad) are commencing to be commercially deployed to avail of a wider bandwidth. Meanwhile, LTE-WLAN aggregation (LWA) efficiently realizes licensed/unlicensed spectrum bundling through the 3GPP dual connectivity framework, whereas LTE Unlicensed and License Assisted Access (LAA) employ a native LTE carrier aggregation technology. The newly standardized MulteFire technology also builds upon LTE but does not even require a licensed carrier anchor, allowing stand-alone unlicensed operations and attracting a new class of wireless providers. Forward-looking Massive MIMO Unlicensed features the capability of placing radiation nulls towards neighboring nodes, boosting spatial reuse and enhancing coexistence. In this tutorial, we will cover in detail — and provide a better understanding of — current and recently proposed unlicensed technologies. On the basis of their key principles, we will identify the rich research opportunities and tackle the fundamental challenges that arise when operating in the unlicensed spectrum.

Adrian Garcia-Rodriguez received the Ph.D. degree in electrical and electronic engineering from University College London, London, U.K., in 2016. He has held research positions in the research institute for technological development and Communication Innovation (IDeTIC) at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, between 2010-2012, and in the RF group of Nokia Bell Labs, Dublin, Ireland, in 2015. Since 2016, he is a post-doctoral researcher in the Small Cells Team of Nokia Bell Labs, Dublin, Ireland. He is co-inventor of several patent applications for wireless communication systems operating in the unlicensed spectrum. Adrian was named an Exemplary Reviewer for IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS in 2016 and he is a co-organizer of the IEEE Globecom 2017 Workshop on large-scale antenna systems in licensed and unlicensed bands.

Giovanni Geraci was born in Sicily, Italy. He earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia, in 2014. Since 2016, he is a Research Scientist at Nokia Bell Labs, Ireland. Prior to joining Bell Labs, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Singapore University of Technology and Design, between 2014-2015. He has also held research appointments at the University of Texas at Austin, USA, in 2013, at Supelec, France, in 2012, and at Alcatel-Lucent, Italy, in 2009. His research currently focuses on small cell networks, massive MIMO systems, unlicensed spectrum technologies, and drone communications. Giovanni holds several pending patents on wireless communication networks, and he is a co-organizer of the IEEE Globecom 2017 Workshop on large-scale antenna systems in licensed and unlicensed bands.


TUT18: The Things We Ought to Know About Digital Communications

Presenter: Bernard Sklar

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 2:00 pm -6:00 pm

This whirlwind tutorial uses novel, easy-to-understand ways to explain our industry's most creative technologies such as OFDM, SC-OFDM, MIMO, and MU-MIMO. We start with a “road-map” of important concepts, and learn how to make reasonable design choices for bandwidth-limited, power-limited, both bandwidth and power-limited systems, while emphasizing the subtle relationships among SNR, bandwidth, time, capacity, and robustness. We emphasize multipath channels and the winning techniques to mitigate their degrading effects. The tutorial is intended for junior graduate students and seasoned engineers who might have forgotten some of the essentials that drive all systems. The notes have about 200 slides dealing with issues such as: List of things we ought to know. Insight gained by equating “like things” to “like things.” What did Shannon teach us about capacity, bandwidth and power? The two basic classes of signaling - different as day and night? Design choices for various channel types. Small-scale fading, and how to avoid worst-cases. Understanding the creativity of OFDM and SC-OFDM. How pre-coding with “dirty-paper coding (DPC)” removes interference.

 Dr. Bernard Sklar has over 60 years of technical experience in industry and academia. He helped develop the MILSTAR satellite system, and was the principal architect for EHF Satellite Data Link Standards at the Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, California. Currently, he is the Director of Advanced Systems at Communications Engineering Services, a consulting company he founded in 1984. He has taught engineering courses at UCLA and the University of Southern California, and has presented numerous training programs throughout the world. Dr. Sklar has published and presented scores of technical papers. He is the recipient of the 1984 Prize Paper Award from the IEEE Communications Society for his tutorial series on digital communications, and he is the author of the book, Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2001. He is past Chair of the Los Angeles Council IEEE Education Committee. He holds a Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles.


TUT19: Mobile Edge Computing Empowers Internet of Things

Presenter: Nirwan Ansari, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 2:00 pm -6:00 pm

Trillions of IoT devices are being deployed rapidly to sense the physical world and share sensed data streams over the network. However, simply sharing data among IoT devices is not sufficient because 1) IoT devices may not understand the physical meanings of shared data owing to the heterogeneous nature of IoT devices, and 2) obtaining knowledge information, which may be hidden behind sensed data, is more intriguing to IoT applications than obtaining sensed data. Thus, empowering IoT with interoperability and analytical capability to understand “big sensed data streams” and extract the related knowledge information presents intriguing values to various industries and markets. Traditionally, data centers act as smart “brains” of the IoT system to parse and analyze the big IoT data streams. However, transmitting a huge volume of IoT data from IoT devices to data centers places a heavy burden on the network, thus significantly increasing the delay of analyzing the big IoT data from the IoT devices. In addition, delay is critical to many IoT applications because of the transient nature of the IoT data. This tutorial will discuss the roadmap in designing an efficient EdgeIoT (mobile Edge computing empowers Internet of Things) architecture, discussing the potential solution to address the interoperability problem in data sharing and the privacy issues in accessing IoT data, presenting flexible IoT service deployment, and providing a novel drone base station aided mobile access network to solve the last mile problem.

Nirwan Ansari is Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NJIT, where he joined in 1988. He has been Visiting (Chair) Professor at several universities. He recently authored Green Mobile Networks: A Networking Perspective (Wiley-IEEE, 2017) with T. Han, and co-authored two other books. He has also (co-)authored more than 500 technical papers, over 200 published in widely cited journals/magazines. He has guest-edited a number of special issues, covering various emerging topics in communications and networking. His current research focuses on green communications and networking, cloud computing, and various aspects of broadband networks. He has served on the Editorial Board and Advisory Board of over ten journals He was elected to serve in the IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc) Board of Governors as a member-at-large (2013-2015). He has chaired ComSoc technical committees, and has been actively organizing numerous IEEE International Conferences/Symposia/Workshops, assuming various leadership roles. Some of his recognitions include IEEE Fellow (Class of 2009), several Excellence in Teaching Awards, a few best paper awards, the ComSoc TCGCC Distinguished Technical Achievement Recognition Award (2017), the ComSoc AHSN TC Technical Recognition Award (2016), Purdue University Outstanding Electrical and Computer Engineer Award (2015), NCE Excellence in Research Award (2014), ComSoc AHSN TC Outstanding Service Recognition Award (2013), NJ Inventors Hall of Fame Inventor of the Year Award (2012), Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award (2010), and designation as an IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer (2006-2009). He has also been granted 35 US patents.


TUT20: Mechanism Design for Network Allocation Problems

Presenter: Achilleas Anastasopoulos, Vijay Subramanian, Abhinav Sinha

Allocation of resources, such as bandwidth, and power, in a wired/wireless communication network is of paramount importance for future applications. The salient feature of this problem is that network agents are distributed and may act in a strategic way, trying to optimize their individual goals. Mechanism Design studies the design of incentives (monetary or otherwise) that once in place, strategic/selfish agents are induced to act in a way that maximizes the overall (social) goal. In this tutorial we will present state of the art mechanisms that are designed in a systematic way and address a number of interesting network allocation problems. Our focus is on mechanisms that possess such properties that makes them practically implementable. In particular the focus is on mechanisms with small message space, feasibility of allocation on and off equilibrium, and communication constraints, i.e., messages need not be broadcasted to all agents. Finally, we will discuss the applicability of combinatorial auctions for resource allocation problems in communication networks. Specifically, we will concentrate on the identification of valuations and the accompanying algorithms for obtaining efficient solutions in polynomial time complexity. During the last decades there has been significant research in understanding how strategic agents in communication/societal/economic networks make decisions in the presence of uncertainty about an underlying state of the system and in the presence of partial information about other agents preferences and actions. At the same time, there has been significant research on how the above decisions can be “steered” towards a socially optimal objective by means of designing appropriate incentives for the network agents. The application areas are extremely broad and examples include wireless resource sharing (such as bandwidth and power), repeated online advertisement auctions, and competing sellers and buyers in energy markets, to name a few.

Our objectives for this tutorial are as follows:

  • Familiarize researchers in the area of communication networks of the broad range of application of games and mechanism design (i.e., the design of incentives for strategic agents)
     
  • Introduce the basic results in this area (implementation in Nash equilibria) through a series of examples of increasing difficulty under a unified framework.
     
  • Discuss state-of-the art mechanisms that are specifically designed for practical implementation (as opposed to just theoretical constructions). These mechanisms possess such properties as feasibility of allocation on and off equilibrium, budget balance, communication constraints, learning guarantees, etc.
     
  • Discuss the applicability of combinatorial auctions in communication networks. In particular, identification of valuations and the accompanying algorithms for obtaining efficient solutions in polynomial time complexity will be discussed.
     
  • We believe that this tutorial is extremely timely, as today’s and future complex networks will have to face the problem of resource allocation in a decentralized fashion and in the presence of strategic agents, and thus designing incentives (monetary or otherwise) will be an important part of the design of future protocols.

Achilleas Anastasopoulos received the Diploma in Electrical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece in 1993, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from University of Southern California in 1994 and 1999, respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. His research interests lie in the general area of communication and information theory, with emphasis in channel coding and multi-user channels; control theory with emphasis in decentralized stochastic control and its connections to communications and information theoretic problems; analysis of dynamic games and mechanism design for resource allocation on networked systems.

He is the co-author of the book Iterative Detection: Adaptivity, Complexity Reduction, and Applications, (Reading, MA: Kluwer Academic, 2001).

Dr. Anastasopoulos is the recipient of the “Myronis Fellowship” in 1996 from the Graduate School at the University of Southern California, the NSF CAREER Award in 2004, and was a co-author for the paper that received the best student paper award in ISIT 2009. He served as a technical program committee member for ICC 2003, 2015, 2016; Globecom 2004, 2012; VTC 2007, 2014, 2015; ISIT 2015, and on the editorial board of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS.

Vijay Subramanian is an Associate Professor in the EECS Department at the Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He got his Ph.D. from the ECE Department at UIUC in 1999. Thereafter, he spent a few years as a researcher at Motorola Inc. and the Hamilton Institute in Maynooth, Ireland, and a research faculty in the EECS Department at Northwestern University, before moving to the Univ. of Michigan in Fall 2014. He has also served as a consultant for Nokia Solution Networks and Qualcomm Flarion Technologies. His research interests are in stochastic analysis, random graphs, game theory and mechanism design with applications to social, economic and technological networks.

Abhinav Sinha received his B.Tech (with honors) and M.Tech in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 2012, and M.S. in Mathematics from the University of Michigan in 2014. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2017, where he worked on Mechanism Design for networks. He will be joining the Graduate School of Business at Columbia University as a postdoctoral research fellow in October 2017. His research interests lie in the general area of network communication, with emphasis in economics of networks — analysis of dynamic games and mechanism design for resource allocation on networked systems; relation between perturbation and regularization based online learning algorithms.


TUT21: 5G Tactile Internet: Application, Challenges and First Solutions

Presenter: Gerhard Fettweis, Frank Fitzek

A big step lies ahead, when moving from today’s 4G cellular networks to tomorrow's 5G network. Today, the network is used for content delivery, e.g. voice, video, data. Tomorrow, the 5G network will provide a ubiquitous Tactile Internet infrastructure for controlling and steering real and virtual objects. For this we must create a control processing and a control communications infrastructure. For enabling the former, distributed mobile edge cloud computing will be created at a level, unheard of today. For enabling the latter, latency and resilience requirements must be met by designing networks along new paradigms. The resulting Tactile Internet will shape our future and our society, touching almost every part of Life. The topic is clearly timely and is the first of its kind that tries to build up a holistic understanding of the 5G technologies. Most others initiatives are focusing on single elements of the 5G architecture.

Gerhard Fettweis earned his Ph.D. under H. Meyr's supervision from RWTH Aachen in 1990. After one year at IBM Research in San Jose, CA, he moved to TCSI Inc., Berkeley, CA. Since 1994 he is Vodafone Chair Professor at TU Dresden, Germany, with 20 companies from Asia/Europe/US sponsoring his research on wireless transmission and chip design. He coordinates 2 DFG centers at TU Dresden, namely cfaed and HAEC. Gerhard is IEEE Fellow, member of the German academy acatech, and his most recent award is the Stuart Meyer Memorial Award from IEEE VTS. In Dresden he has spun-out eleven start-ups, and setup funded projects in volume of close to EUR 1/2 billion. He has helped organizing IEEE conferences, most notably as TPC Chair of ICC 2009 and of TTM 2012, and as General Chair of VTC Spring 2013 and DATE 2014.

Frank H. P. Fitzek is a Professor and chair of the communication networks group at Technische Universität Dresden coordinating the 5G Lab Germany. He received his diploma (Dipl.-Ing.) degree in electrical engineering from the University of Technology - Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) - Aachen, Germany, in 1997 and his Ph.D. (Dr.-Ing.) in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University Berlin, Germany in 2002 and became Adjunct Professor at the University of Ferrara, Italy in the same year. In 2003 he joined Aalborg University as Associate Professor and later became Professor. He co-founded several start-up companies starting with acticom GmbH in Berlin in 1999. He has visited various research institutes including Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), VTT, and Arizona State University. In 2005 he won the YRP award for the work on MIMO MDC and received the Young Elite Researcher Award of Denmark. He was selected to receive the NOKIA Champion Award several times in a row from 2007 to 2011. In 2008 he was awarded the Nokia Achievement Award for his work on cooperative networks. In 2011 he received the SAPERE AUDE research grant from the Danish government and in 2012 he received the Vodafone Innovation price. His current research interests are in the areas of wireless and mobile 5G communication networks, mobile phone programming, network coding, cross layer as well as energy efficient protocol design and cooperative networking.


TUT22:Ultra-Low Latency Mobile Networking

Presenter:Professor Kwang-Cheng Chen, University of South Florida

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 2:00 pm -6:00 pm

Autonomous (or unmanned) vehicles (AVs) emerge as one major technological paradigm shift of the industry and human society, while introducing much more technological challenges in wireless networks beyond the connected vehicles. As the technology for single intelligent vehicle becoming mature, the real challenge comes from reliable, safe, real-time operation of autonomous vehicles in massive scale. To achieve such multi-scale computing and control, effective cloud computing, edge computing, and on-board computing, networking and computing in real-time to interact with environments and other agents such as vehicles and individuals. Ultra-low latency networking in the order of milliseconds is inevitably wanted to ensure successful control and services in this most challenging Internet of Things. Considering high reliability and safety, various innovative networking technologies would be needed. This tutorial linking networking with artificial intelligence will present key aspects of ultra-low latency mobile networking in heterogeneous networking architecture, non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA), 5G cellular (R14 and potential R15), network function virtualization (NFV) of network resources, machine learning enabled mobility management, multi-hop networking for vehicles, secure and resilient networking, and sensor networks, toward the facilitation of ultra-low latency networking and information exchange to enable real-time decisions/actions and control, and thus the successful deployment of AVs in massive scale. The contents include

  • Autonomous vehicles as a service (AVaaS) and the need of low-latency networking
  • Dedicated V2I vehicular networks and V2V networking for Connected Vehicles
  • 5G cellular networks for Connected Vehicles
  • Grant-Free Wireless Communications and Error Control
  • Technology Revolution of Low-Latency Heterogeneous Cellular Networks
  • Software Defined Network (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV)
  • Proactive Network Association, Radio Resource Allocation and NOMA to Achieve Ultra-Low Latency Mobile Networking
  •  Anticipatory Mobility Management by machine learning and big data analytics
  • Security in vehicular networks for AVs

Kwang-Cheng Chen is a Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA, since 2016. From 1987 to 1998, Dr. Chen worked with SSE, COMSAT, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and National Tsing Hua University, in mobile communications and networks. During 1998-2016, he was with National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, as the Distinguished Professor and Irving T. Ho Chair Professor in the College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, National Taiwan University. Dr. Chen founded a wireless IC design company in 2001, which was acquired by MediaTek Inc. in 2004. He has been actively involving in the organization of various IEEE conferences as General/TPC chair/co-chair (2002 IEEE Globecom, 2010 IEEE VTC-Spring, and 2020 IEEE Globecom), serving editorships with a few prestigious IEEE journals, and various IEEE volunteer services such as IEEE Fellow Committee, IEEE VTS Fellow Evaluation Committee, IEEE VTS Distinguished Lecturer, IEEE COMSOC NEC, Emerging Technology Committee, etc. He founds and chairs the Technical Committee on Social Networks in the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Chen also has contributed essential technology to various international standards like IEEE 802 wireless LANs, Bluetooth, LTE and LTE-A. He has authored and co-authored over 300 IEEE publications and more than 23 granted US patents. He co-edited (with R. DeMarca) the book Mobile WiMAX published by Wiley, and authored the book Principles of Communications published by River, and co-authored (with R. Prasad) another book Cognitive Radio Networks published by Wiley. Dr. Chen is an IEEE Fellow and has received a number of awards including 2011 IEEE COMSOC WTC Recognition Award, 2014 IEEE Jack Neubauer Memorial Award, 2014 IEEE COMSOC AP Outstanding Paper Award. Dr. Chen’s current research interests include wireless networks, IoT/CPS, social networks and data analytics, and cybersecurity.


TUT23: Securing the Internet of Things: A Machine Learning Approach

Presenters: Aziz Mohaisen (University of Central Florida), Joongheon Kim (Chung-Ang University)

Thursday, 24 May 2018: 2:00 pm -6:00 pm

Today, even the simplest computer system found in IoT settings encompasses a complex convergence of software, hardware, and protocol designs and entities. The security and reliability of such entities is of paramount importance to those systems. For example, today’s consumer-grade tablets found in smart home networks are featured with complex software, such as Android and its applications, sophisticated hardware featured with a large array of sensors and peripherals, and many interdependent communication protocols. The same features are associated with many Internet of Things devices, including home entertainment systems, smart TV, etc. The security and reliability of each and every of those entities in such systems is of paramount importance to their operation. To this end, to secure the Internet of Things, there are two general approaches: the clean slate approach and the incremental approach. The former approach is prohibitively expensive, and does not address the needs of legacy and well deployed systems, which are the advantages of the latter approach. Manually addressing security issues using the second approach does not scale to the size of the problems faced by today’s complex computer systems, thus automation is required. One of the approaches to automated the security analysis and defense in computer systems is through machine learning: fully automated algorithms to detect security issues in the design and operation of computer systems, at the software, hardware and protocol level, and to guide defenses. In this tutorial, we review the state-of-the-art on machine learning applications for end-to-end Internet of Things systems security, by touching upon security issues at the hardware, software, and protocol level and how they are addressed using machine learning. Through this tutorial, we will teach the various approaches used for performing behavior-based analyses used for engineering (or automatically extracting) features from the behavior of software associated with it use, the characteristics of hardware associated with baselines and behaviors of sensors, and the communication protocol-level artifacts. We survey the existing literature on applications of such approach, including malware detection and behavior profiling and fingerprinting. We supplement our tutorial with a look into the applications of deep learning to such application area, and how advances in GPU-CPU co-design can further make those applications of machine learning more practical. Finally, we conclude with open directions, where the community has to come together and address the problems at hand.

Joongheon Kim has been an assistant professor of Computer Science and Engineering with Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea, since 2016. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Korea University, Seoul, Korea, in 2004 and 2006, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, USA, in 2014. Before joining USC, he was a research engineer with LG Electronics, Seoul, Korea, from 2006 to 2009. He was also a systems engineer with Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA, from 2013 to 2016. He has been published his research results in top-tier venues such as IEEE ICC, IEEE GLOBECOM, ACM MobiSys, ACM Multimedia, ACM HotPower, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting, IEEE Internet of Things Journal. He was awarded USC Annenberg Graduate Fellowship with his Ph.D. admission from USC, in 2009.

Aziz Mohaisen earned his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota in 2012. Currently, he is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Central Florida. Prior to joining Central Florida, he was an Assistant Professor at SUNY Buffalo (2015-2017), a Senior Research Scientist at Verisign Labs (2012-2015), and a Researcher at ETRI, a government-backed researched institute in South Korea (2007-2009). His research interests are broadly in cybersecurity, with applications to DDoS, malware, blockchain, and emerging networking technologies, such as Internet of Things. He was awarded the Summer Faculty Fellowship from the US AFOSR (2016), the Best Student Paper at ICDCS (2017), the Best Paper Award at WISA (2014), the Best Poster Award at IEEE CNS (2014), and a Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the University of Minnesota (2011). He was recognized for his service to IEEE INFOCOM (2017) and IEEE CNS (2016), and has been on the organizing committee of IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE ICDCS, IEEE CNS, IEEE PAC, SecureComm, ICCCN, HotWeb, MobiSys, AsiaCCS, etc. His research has been supported by various grants, and featured in MIT Technology Review, the New Scientist, Minnesota Daily, Slashdot, The Verge, Deep Dot Web, and Slate, etc. He is a member of ACM and a senior member of IEEE.


TUT24: Ultra Dense Networks: Principles and Technologies

Presenters: Haijun Zhang, Chunxiao Jiang, Jingxian Wu

Nowadays, the mobile network no longer just connects people but is evolving into billions of devices, such as sensors, controllers, machines, autonomous vehicles, drones, people and things with each other and then achieves information and Intelligence. From a planning and optimization perspective on the mobile network, this means that we also need a lot more flexibility to address these future needs. Next-generation (5G) wireless systems are characterized by three key features: heterogeneity, in terms of technology and services, dynamics, in terms of rapidly varying environments and uncertainty, and size, in terms of number of users, nodes, and services. The need for smart, secure, and autonomic network design has become a central research issue in a variety of applications and scenarios. Ultra dense networks (UDN) have attracted intense interest from both academia and industry to potentially improve spatial reuse and coverage, thus allowing cellular systems to achieve higher data rates, while retaining the seamless connectivity and mobility of cellular networks. However, considering the severe inter-tier interference and limited cooperative gains resulting from the constrained and non-ideal transmissions between adjacent base stations, a new paradigm for improving both spectral efficiency and energy efficiency through suppressing inter-tier interference and enhancing the cooperative processing capabilities is needed in the practical evolution of UDN.

This tutorial will identify and discuss technical challenges and recent results related to the UDN in 5G mobile networks. The tutorial is mainly divided into four parts. In the first part, we will introduce UDN, discuss about the UDNs system architecture, and provide some main technical challenges. In the second part, we will focus on the issue of resource management in UDN and provide different recent research findings that help us to develop engineering insights. In the third part, we will address the signal processing and PHY layer design of UDN and address some key research problems. In the last part, we will summarize by providing a future outlook of UDN.

Haijun Zhang (M'13, SM'17) is currently a Full Professor in University of Science and Technology Beijing, China. He was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver Campus, Canada. Dr. Zhang has published more than 90 papers and authored 2 books. He serves as Editor of Journal of Network and Computer Applications, Wireless Networks, Telecommunication Systems, and KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems, and serves/served as a leading Guest Editor for IEEE Communications Magazine, IEEE Transactions on Emerging Topics in Computing and ACM/Springer Mobile Networks & Applications. He serves/served as General Co-Chair of 5GWN'17 and GameNets'16, Track Chair of ScalCom2015, Symposium Chair of the GameNets'14, and Co-Chair of Workshop on 5G Ultra Dense Networks in ICC 2017, Co-Chair of Workshop on 5G Ultra Dense Networks in Globecom 2017, and Co-Chair of Workshop on LTE-U in Globecom 2017. Prof. Zhang received the Young Elite Scientist Sponsorship Program by CAST in 2016 and received the IEEE ComSoc Young Author Best Paper Award in 2017.

Chunxiao Jiang (S’09—M’13-SM’15) received the B.S. in information engineering from Beihang University in Jun. 2008 and the Ph.D. in electronic engineering from Tsinghua University in Jan. 2013, both with the highest honors. From Feb. 2013 - Jun. 2016, Dr. Jiang was a Postdoc in the Department of Electronic Engineering Tsinghua University, during which he visited University of Maryland College Park and University of Southampton. Since July 2016, he became an assistant research fellow in Tsinghua Space Center, Tsinghua University. His research interests include space networks, heterogeneous networks, social networks, and big data privacy. He has authored/co-authored 150+ technical papers including 70+ IEEE journal papers. He will serve/has served as IEEE ICC 2018 Symposium Co-Chair for Communications and Information System Security and IEEE ICC 2017 Workshop Co-Chair for Workshop on 5G Ultra Dense Networks. He has also served as a Guest Editor of IEEE Communications Magazine “Heterogeneous Ultra Dense Networks”, and a Guest Editor of ACM/SPRINGER MOBILE NETWORKS & APPLICATIONS “Game Theory for 5G Wireless Networks”. He is the recipient of the Best Paper Award from IEEE GLOBECOM in 2013, the Best Student Paper Award from IEEE GlobalSIP in 2015, IEEE Transactions on Communications Exemplary Reviewer in 2016, IEEE Communications Society Young Author Best Paper Award in 2017, Best Paper Award from IEEE IWCMC in 2017, the Distinguished Dissertation Award from CAAI (Chinese Association for Artificial Intelligence) in 2014 and the Tsinghua Outstanding Postdoc Fellow Award (only ten winners each year) in 2015. He is a senior member of IEEE ComSoc.

Jingxian Wu (S'04-M'06-SM'15) received the B.S. (EE) degree from the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, China, in 1998, the M.S. (EE) degree from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2001, and the Ph.D. (EE) degree from the University of Missouri at Columbia, Missouri, USA, in 2005. He is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. His research interests mainly focus on signal processing for large scale networks and wireless communications, including energy efficient information sensing and processing, interference-limited wireless networks, high mobility communications, green communications, and statistical data analytics, etc. He served as symposium or track co-chairs for a number of international conferences, such as the 2012 IEEE International Conference on Communications, the 2009, 2015, and 2017 IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference, the 2017 International Conference on Communications in China, and the 2017 Wireless Communication and Signal Processing Conference, etc. He served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY from 2007 to 2011 an Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS from 2011 to 2016, and is now serving as an Associate Editor of the IEEE ACCESS.